ADVERTISEMENT

Study says mental illness may increase risk of COVID-19 breakout

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Story at a glance

  • Researchers at the University of California, San Francisco looked at data on 263,697 patients from the United States Department of Veterans Affairs who had completed their vaccinations and had at least one COVID-19 test.

  • Just over 51 percent have received at least one psychiatric diagnosis in the past five years and 14.8 percent have experienced a COVID-19 breakthrough.

  • Breakout risk for patients over 65 years of age was 24 percent higher for those with a substance use disorder, 23 percent higher for those with psychotic disorders, 16 percent for bipolar disorder, 14 percent for adjustment disorder and 12 percent for anxiety.

A new study shows that people who have been vaccinated against COVID-19 and have a history of certain mental illnesses may be more likely to develop sudden infections.

Researchers at the University of California, San Francisco looked at data on 263,697 patients from the United States Department of Veterans Affairs who had completed their vaccinations and had at least one COVID-19 test. Just over 51 percent have received at least one psychiatric diagnosis within the past five years and 14.8 percent have had a COVID-19 infection.

Patients over the age of 65 with substance use disorder, psychotic disorders, bipolar disorder, adjustment disorder, and anxiety have a 24 percent increased risk of COVID-19 infection while patients under 65 have an 11 percent greater risk of infection. In a solitary condition compared to those who do not have them. a history of mental illness;

“Our research suggests that the increase in penetrative infection in people with psychiatric disorders cannot be fully explained by sociodemographic factors or pre-existing conditions,” said O’Donovan, senior author of the study. “It is possible that immunity wanes after vaccination more quickly or more strongly for people with psychiatric disorders and/or may have less protection for newer variants.”

“Mental health is important to consider in conjunction with other risk factors, and some patients should be prioritized for reinforcements and other important preventative efforts,” she continued.

Breakout risk for patients over 65 years of age was 24 percent higher for those with substance abuse, 23 percent higher for those with psychotic disorders, 16 percent for bipolar disorder, and 14 percent for adjustment disorder. and 12 percent for anxiety.

The average age of patients in the study was 66 and nearly 91 percent were male. The researchers adjusted data for age, sex, race, ethnicity, vaccine type as well as smoking and underlying conditions such as obesity, diabetes, sleep apnea, cardiovascular disease, lung, kidney, liver, HIV and cancer.


America is changing faster than ever! Add Change America to File Facebook or Twitter Feed to stay on top of the news.


The study’s first author, Christine Nishimi, attributed the higher incidence of breakouts in adults over 65 years of age to a “decreased immune response to the vaccine associated with certain psychiatric disorders, which may be more serious in the elderly.”

Nishimi added that older patients with psychiatric diagnoses may need more personalized healthcare, which “could increase their interaction with the healthcare system.”

The study adds to a growing body of the relationship between COVID-19 and mental health. A separate study released earlier this week by researchers from the University of California, San Francisco, concluded that nearly half of young adults experienced mental health symptoms during the second year of the epidemic.

The results of both teams showed a decrease from the previous year. A study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that 63 percent of young adults experienced symptoms of depression or anxiety in June 2020.


Read more stories about changing America

Omicron lasts longer on surfaces and skin than previous variants: studies

Researchers say exercise can treat COVID symptoms

Just 20 minutes of exercise a day at 70 minutes could stave off major heart disease: Study

We need to determine when an epidemic becomes endemic

Posted on April 15, 2022

ADVERTISEMENT

Leave a Comment

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT